Tag Archives: queen

Badger culling and Brian May

28 Aug

Brian May of Queen

Well, an unholy row is brewing between Brian May of Queen and the NFU.  Why is this?  It’s that old chestnut, badger culling to help prevention of bovine TB that I have been blogging about for some time now.  The pilot sites have been approved, a legal objection has been over ruled so it looks as if a culling pilot will commence.

Back to the row – Brian May wrote an article in the Mail on Sunday which was around voting Conservative (which he did) and the approval of badger culling.  Mr May intimated that he would not vote for David Cameron in the future as he has allowed the badger culling to go ahead and that this is a “particularly nasty kind of Conservatism”.  He also said that anyone that disagreed with the culling was branded as a ‘nutter’ by the NFU and Countryside Alliance.

The NFU has responded that it is wrong to politicize the debate rather than treating it as an animal welfare issue particularly as Mr May linked the culling to blood sports – hare coursing and hunting etc…

Well, the jury is out on whether the pilot culls will work and then if they will be extended, but one thing I am certain of is that we haven’t heard the last from Brian May yet.

Aside

More about badger culling; update

20 Jan

Well, the badger culling pilot has been given the green light.  The first areas will be west Gloucestershire and west Somerset and is likely to start in August for a period of 6 weeks.  This will just be a start and is likely to progress to other areas and the aim is to reduce badger populations inside the cull zones by at least 70%.  Defra anticipates allowing 10 new cull zones each year.

Why has this been given the go-ahead?  The aim is to reduce tuberculosis in cattle and there have been strong debates for and against culling; Brian May of Queen has been particularly vociferous as a voice against badger culling.

The Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra) says that “culling in highly affected areas can constrain a disease that is costing about £100m per year and necessitates the death of tens of thousands of cattle”.  However, opponents, including scientists who spent a decade researching the issue, argue that culling cannot be a cost-effective way of tackling the disease and that it may destroy the badgers’ social structure so that they may move to other areas thus spreading the tuberculosis bacterium to other farms.

I wonder if we are just a bit sentimental about the badger, perhaps more so than deer or moles and if that alters our judgement.  I am going to sit on the fence in my blog about my opinion on culling, but my opinion is based on the effect on wildlife and whether I feel any cull would be effective anyway.Image