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Moles

25 Jun

Wimbledon is here and so is our traditional British summer. Whilst rain doesn’t spell the end of matches for Federer and Murray any more, it can mean problems for your lawn, bowling green or golf course. The damp conditions we’ve had this year means that our earthworms are thriving and so unfortunately are the moles who live off them.

Although moles are generally solitary creatures they can  cause havoc  in the garden in no time at all by building networks of tunnels. They can quickly  destroy crops and leave you with greater problems than just an unsightly lawn.

Here at Abate we can tackle your mole problem in several ways. Either visit our shop or get in touch to see how we can help you restore your grass to it’s former glory. 

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Are they Wasps or Bees?

29 May

Pest Management isn’t just about preventing and removing rats and pigeons, it’s so much more including helping move those all important bees to a safe place.

This time of year we are usually already in the swing of gardening, BBQs and general summer mode. However the recent weather up to about a week or so ago has hindered us and the insect world, so spare a thought for them as they are working twice as hard to play catch up and help keep the planet spinning.

Bees are swarming now the warm spell is here but don’t be afraid of them as they are not interested in us. Queens will land to rest which can be almost anywhere but usually south to south west facing. Be proactive! know and find out who your local beekeepers are and have their phone number to hand. They would usually be more than happy to come and take the nest away if they can get to the queen. We need bees to help us and so we will only treat them as an absolute last resort and only if it is a threat to public health.

Please remember Bees swarm and wasps don’t as quite a few people get caught out thinking they have wasps. Wasp nests are imminent as the weather has dramatically changed, although it is usually a few more weeks yet before we start getting lots of calls for them.

So, can you tell the difference

Wasps

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Avishock – electric bird deterrent

13 Apr

We have been working hard at St Georges Chapel in Gt Yarmouth to install the Avishock bird deterrent system.  For bird proofing, it is an obvious choice, particularly for Listed buildings and buildings of architectural merit and beauty.  Why?  Because it is almost invisible aesthetically; no spikes or nets to detract from the beauty of a building and also to minimise damage to the fabric of the building too.

We are often asked “does it kill the bird” – well, no one would really want dead birds dropping down from the sky off buildings, so the answer of course is no!  It acts just like an animal electric fence around a field.  The bird will fly off if it touches the strip and will also soon learn that this is not a place for him or her to perch.

If you have 5 minutes, take a look at our video and see how we installed the Avishock system.

 

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More about badger culling; update

20 Jan

Well, the badger culling pilot has been given the green light.  The first areas will be west Gloucestershire and west Somerset and is likely to start in August for a period of 6 weeks.  This will just be a start and is likely to progress to other areas and the aim is to reduce badger populations inside the cull zones by at least 70%.  Defra anticipates allowing 10 new cull zones each year.

Why has this been given the go-ahead?  The aim is to reduce tuberculosis in cattle and there have been strong debates for and against culling; Brian May of Queen has been particularly vociferous as a voice against badger culling.

The Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra) says that “culling in highly affected areas can constrain a disease that is costing about £100m per year and necessitates the death of tens of thousands of cattle”.  However, opponents, including scientists who spent a decade researching the issue, argue that culling cannot be a cost-effective way of tackling the disease and that it may destroy the badgers’ social structure so that they may move to other areas thus spreading the tuberculosis bacterium to other farms.

I wonder if we are just a bit sentimental about the badger, perhaps more so than deer or moles and if that alters our judgement.  I am going to sit on the fence in my blog about my opinion on culling, but my opinion is based on the effect on wildlife and whether I feel any cull would be effective anyway.Image